Italy Reveals Image of Young Jesus

Detectives used a computer  program to reverse the aging  process on an image from the Turin Shroud, top left, to arrive at the  younger Christ, bottom right.

Detectives used a computer program to reverse the aging process on an image from the Turin Shroud, top left, to arrive at the younger Christ, bottom right.

Italian detectives claim to have revealed how Jesus Christ looked as a child based on computer forensics and the world’s most famous relic, the Shroud of Turin.

Italy claims this is what Jesus Christ would have looked like as a young boy.

Italy claims this is what Jesus Christ would have looked like as a young boy.

Using the Shroud, the burial cloth of Jesus, police investigators have generated a photo image from the facial image on the material. And from this they reversed the aging process to create an image of young Jesus, by reducing the size of the jaw, raising the chin and straightening the nose.

The technique effectively reverses the method that Italian police use to generate current likenesses of criminals, for whom new photo images are needed when they have been on the run for decades.

The image of Jesus as a young boy and the methods used to create it, will be the subject of an upcoming program on Italian television. But the exercise was done to mark the latest ostensione – a rare public display of the Shroud at the Turin Cathedral.

The 14-foot-long sheet, made of herring-bone linen cloth, appears to show the front and back impression of a bearded man with long hair. The body imprinted on the cloth appears to bear numerous injuries consistent with crucifixion, plus a gash in its side, consistent with the lance-wound suffered by Jesus. It will be on public display for two months, with millions of visitors expected. When the shroud was last presented to the public in 2010, more than two million people filed past it.

Pope Francis decreed the latest exhibition to mark the 200th anniversary of the birth of St. John Bosco, a 19th century monk who devoted his life to the education of poor children in newly-industrialized Turin. Pope Francis, who has family roots in the Piedmont region, is due to visit Turin and the exhibition June 20-21.

The shroud will be on display for 12 hours a day from 7:30am to 7:30pm with an entry fee. Viewers will be afforded only a few minutes each in front of the relic, although they will be able to linger longer at a specially-made model and a related exhibition.



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